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Which Leadership Type Do You Prefer?

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  • mjmnl
    commented on Guest's reply
    I believe autocrats only work if the leader is also knowledgeable on how to lead properly. Don't wanna get political here but the best example I could think of are some country leaders that are autocrats but end up putting their country in its worst state yet. Hopefully, in a corporate office setting, autocrats are really the skilled ones who could really bring out the best in their employees.

  • Lou
    commented on 's reply
    This is so true. Come to think of it, it is not really the leadership style that matters but the work ethics of the leader. A leader who is not willing to be transparent, points fingers at his/her members to cover-up his/her own mistakes, does not want to acknowledge his/her mistakes, and keeps changing the narrative to make it look like he/she is the victim, can easily lead the team members to lose their trust. However, we still do our tasks to the best of our abilities. It's just that the work environment is not as friendly as it is expected to be. But, at the end of the day, we still perform our tasks and yes, the leadership style becomes irrelevant.

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I prefer the autocrat hahahah! The only way some things get done in moments of turbulence

    Leave a comment:


  • mjmnl
    commented on 's reply
    Totally in sync with this statement @jcoppi29: "The older generations did go through "worse", but does that automatically mean, the future generations have to as well? Isn't the purpose of improvement to prevent dire circumstances from recurring?". Our elders have always been telling us "that's not how we did it before", "you should do this to succeed", "been there done that". As much as we want to, it's hard to understand each generation especially with the differences in belief and environment. As a millennial, I also tend to think that gen Z is so entitled. But then, my mom also thinks millennials have it easy as well. So I guess life just gets better and easier for the newer generation and there's no problem with that.

  • jcoppi29
    commented on 's reply
    Dont want to put US election topics here but it kinda relates to Skye's statement. When 2016 came, I was very much opposed to Trump being voted, but come 2020, even though I'm not denying his many blunders, it seems his policy decisions and implementation were actually more effective than expected, even if personality wise, there's really no argument.

  • Skye
    commented on 's reply
    What I am getting is that it is more about work ethics than the style of leadership that matters. If I may add, integrity matters a lot too, for me, in a leader. Doing the right thing even when others cannot see you. I guess it is part of work ethics too.

  • Skye
    commented on 's reply
    jcoppi29, I just type @+handle. No spaces. Sometimes it works. Sometimes it doesn't.

    Kamille, I agree with your statement that "No one likes a micro-manager, but if it promotes consistency then I'm not complaining." At some point, at the beginning usually, I want a micromanager for me. Then once I have learned the ropes, leave me be. hahaha...

  • jcoppi29
    commented on 's reply
    I think it's actually a much more complex topic because it includes a generational spectrum. On one extreme end would be the no nonsense, boomer leadership styles that had bullies, ruthless bosses without merit, also the same line that harassed people to suicide and all that while solely focusing on merit and hard work (which focuses on stripes earned as Skye said), on the other hand, would be the newbies that don't want to get merit, instead, would just scare the HR away, are entitled, or would play the victim card just to climb up the corporate ladder.

    Thing is, facts or at least, studies, are better bases than opinions. It's a fact that punishment or punitive processes are counter-productive long-term if these are the only means to instill integrity, merit, and work ethic. Fear isn't an independent motivator -- if it is, it snaps too many people (and when I say snap, they either get suicidal or homicidal). This is why there's a sandwich method synthesis of the old ways and the newer ways.

    Contrary to the newbie culture these days, however, it's also recommended to expose children and newbies to hardship, and let them earn their place. Not giving into their tantrums teaches them accountability and responsibility, spoiling them is just as bad as over-punishing them. I guess, there has to be a balance.

    The older generations did go through "worse", but does that automatically mean, the future generations have to as well? Isn't the purpose of improvement to prevent dire circumstances from recurring? It's a very tricky topic.

    I'm a millenial - millennials are pretty old now lmao -- between 25-35ish I think. The baby boomers never really understood my generation (or so thats how it was, now i get along with my parents), and a sign of aging for me is not understanding the next one, Gen Z. Then again, the universals have to focused on to find common ground, otherwise, it's just a pissing contest of who's had it worst, who is more entitled, who is more "worthy" and all that socially constructed, genetically triggered cycle pattern that has been going on since the dawn of humanity. It's just a cycle.

  • Kamille
    commented on 's reply
    I agree with you kdy. Regardless of leadership styles, or whether its effective or not, we should always attend to our tasks. I've had different leaders in the past, all with different leadership styles, but all contributed to professional growth. Our work ethics, as well as our leaders', matter the most.

  • Skye
    commented on 's reply
    hahaha... kick 'em out? @Bjun?

    I guess what Gerhard is saying is that the young ones feel entitled and are quite sensitive. HR policies have evolved. Bosses are now questioned whereas before, what they say is the law. Employees, across all ages, are more empowered.

    Older employees have been bound by a different set of rules, some rules not even set by HR. Just rules set by society. So even if the way the workplace is run these days, the elders are still seeing a hug gap between what they did before and how it is now.

    This empowerment of the newbies, on th eother hand, are magnified because they know the policies, they know how to work them from the very start. And because they are new, the seasoned employees frown upon this. Thinking that these children have not earned their stripes yet, therefore, they should not complain or whatever.

    Just my two cents.

    On a side note, I am happy that I am with a good leader who respects each person, regardless of generation.

  • kdy
    replied
    A thought just occurred to me while reading the comments. Though I prefer a leader who is good in motivating his/her direct reports, I wouldn't really mind what leadership style my leader has. At the end of the day, each of these leadership styles would have its own pros and cons. Besides, my performance and career growth are my responsibility first, before my leader's. I guess I would appreciate ethics a lot more than the leadership style. When a leader displays unethical behaviors like sharing performance or personal information to others behind a direct report's back, then the leadership style becomes even more irrelevant.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcoppi29
    commented on 's reply
    @Bjun

    I think there should be a leadership training with a secret assessment phase. I've seen a lot of people take leadership trainings and seminars but only for its badges and awards -- back in their comfort zone or their territory, they resume as usual most times -- or I'm really just traumatized by my BPO bosses lmao.

    Also true, it's hard to modify one's work ethic if it has been nurtured in an environment by tenure. Enable them long enough, they stick to those patterns continuously.

  • jcoppi29
    commented on 's reply
    @Indelible_Mark

    Satisfaction is internal and subjective yet it can also be externally triggered -- that thing called validation. Human beings are social, after all, so there's such a thing wherein one has a tendency to deny themselves the feeling, aka, invalidate it, and wait for someone else to validate it (extra effective if it comes from a person of power, heck, look at how fans respond to being acknowledged by their idols). It's kinda related to why social media is a huge trend -- hyper-validation.

    Based on mjmnl's post then, when the leader draws out this sense of satisfaction, they validate it so the person invalidating it internally will welcome it and feel good. It can then stretch out to the idea that leaders bring out the best from their colleagues.

    Motivation, to clarify, isn't only internal. If it was, human beings won't be social beings at all. The social aspect is a strong motivator and it's more external than internal. Most motivational sources have various mixes of internal-eternal mixes.

    Turning to one's preferred leadership style may have something to do with one's internal leadership traits, or as a result of experience. It's like how parents teach kids two main things -- how to be a person, and how not to be one.

    though im curious as to why you turn the table to the question "how can i be the leader i would like?". Generally, if the topic is asking the general populace the leader they'd like and they get greeted a table turn question, it's intent isn't to ask the question, rather, to prevent people serving under leaders from asking questions. It is interesting then who benefits and uses such rhetoric quite often.

  • Kamille
    commented on 's reply
    Interesting read! I was trying to decide which one I prefer but then I read the last paragraph at the bottom of the article.
    Its true that there really isn't a formula for the 'best' or 'most effective' leader. Just like what the article mentioned, it will depend on a lot of factors e.i the challenges and situations, and sometimes even the kind of team he is leading. I think the most effective leader would be someone who has the skills to adapt his leadership style in various situations. Besides, the world is too dynamic and having just one style would never be enough.
    Last edited by Kamille; 09-14-2020, 01:58 PM.

  • Indelible_Mark
    commented on 's reply
    Isn't satisfaction also 'intrinsic'..so much so that a good leader will 'draw out' this sense of satisfaction from an employee? or colleague? Then you mentioned motivation..also internal..and yet we turn to our ideal leadership style?

    Shouldn't we be looking inwards and how I can be the leader that I would like?

    Maybe THAT is the leadership style we each are trying to chase down...who we want to be 😜
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