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Corona Virus: Now might be the time to get enrolled in a distance learning program!

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  • mjmnl
    commented on 's reply
    Kids may feel lonely too during this pandemic. Months ago, it's so easy for them to play normally with their friends and neighbors. They can interact with their teacher anytime in school, go to the mall, church, and wherever they opt to go. But because of COVID19, everything has changed and they are part of the most vulnerable class. My nephew is still in contact with his friends, thanks to technology. I just hope that their social skills won't be negatively affected that much.

    Here's a link to an article I've found to help kids combat loneliness during the pandemic: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...h%20conditions.

  • Skye
    commented on 's reply
    I feel sad for the kids now that they are going to do online or distance learning. Kids are meant to move and socialize. But now, they can't. They are not allowed outside human contact. But kids are resilient. They'll get through this.

  • JerryYan
    commented on 's reply
    This is true. After this first implementation of most schools, we can look forward to how each school will adapt and be more efficient in terms of their fees in relation to blended learning. This goes as some countries may slowly allow on-site activities for higher education and research. Nice time to weigh and analyze how much of quality education we are looking for or need.

  • Gerhard
    replied
    I wonder how most of Europe is fairing with the resurgence of Covid-19, most kids have to stop school which might be the same with older college kids. Safe to say that online distance learning is here for another year until things are fixed.

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  • JerryYan
    replied
    One positive note is that with distance learning, less people have to wade through traffic to get to their schools/work. It is up to us how to design each of our learning/workspaces. It is also up to us, however, to cope with this change in scenery and maintain or improve performance.

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  • mjmnl
    replied
    Can't seem to stop researching about this coronavirus outbreak. Here's a good article that I found on BBC: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-51235105. It has summarized every data that we wanted to know about the current situation using charts, graphs, and some infographics. The virus started spreading throughout the world in January of this year but was quickly recognized as a global pandemic last March 11 which makes us already in our 9th month battling for our health and safety. I guess it's really the best time to get yourself enrolled in a distance learning program. Only if you have the means to do it. You don't want to be suffering from financial problems during these times. Good thing there are distance learning programs that give quality education without spending ten to a hundred thousand dollars.
    Last edited by mjmnl; 11-03-2020, 04:45 AM.

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  • Kamille
    commented on 's reply
    This is true jcoppi29. We also built a pc months ago and was shocked to see people standing in lines over the heat of the sun for over a thousand dollar computer just for a grade schooler's online learning. I understand they want to give the best for their kid's learning, and not everyone is tech-savvy. I just wish schools gave recommendation for gadgets and specs that can be used, instead of spending so much on computers in the midst of a pandemic.

  • Skye
    commented on 's reply
    Where is the equity in education for those who lack the resources to do distance learning? Those in third world countries? Those that depend on the free education (and facilities) offered by the public school system?

    How about them?

    The future may be here for all, but not all can enjoy that future right now.

  • mjmnl
    commented on 's reply
    It's a wise choice to choose a school that has been providing this service for years. They know the ins and outs of the business and even know how to handle and resolve difficulties that the students experience. These distance education providers won't be there for long if it's not giving satisfactory service to their students, right? So it seems really effective. Although, there are schools that have successfully transitioned to online learning despite doing traditional learning since the beginning. It's really weighing what school would be best for you. Better to do research, read reviews, and then weigh these institutions.

  • Gerhard
    replied
    Big factor most students find a complete turn off or waste of time with most online distance learning providers or online schools are the prices. Noticeably the traditional schools who have switched to online or blended learning just to stay open still included "MISC" fees that are applicable to face to face learning. That is something that has to addressed or usually the elephant in the room.

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  • Skye
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, it is now a reality. And it is good to choose an established school providing online learning. That is also the reason why I pulled out my children from their previous school. Their traditional school is now scrambling on how to effectively educate their students on a distance learning platform - whether it is fully online or still with physical books. If the facilitators and educators are still on the learning curve and the kids are also on the learning curve of this system, there would be a great gap to close and a lot of stress. So I chose a school with a proven track record in a distance learning platform. My kids will not be guinea pigs of a school that has just adapted a new system. I am not saying it is gonna be a failure. But since I have what I believe is a better option, why not take it?

  • jcoppi29
    commented on 's reply
    @skye

    That's actually handy, having people you trust that know what you don't when it comes to these things. I've seen a lot of people get "online learning" computers that are overkill to the point that it can run 4k footage -- when you just need 1080p and you can read text already. So many opportunists these days really, good to have tech savvy contacts around.

  • Bjun
    replied
    It's been 5-6 months since the start of the pandemic and people are no longer just exploring online learning. It is the reality for most students these days. The advantage of online training providers, such as ICI, is that they've been providing online training for years while other schools are just starting to do it since a few months. It would be interesting to see if the competition between online training providers would be steeper now that students are veering towards online learning.

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  • Skye
    commented on 's reply
    Raising my hand here jcoppi29. I am that not-so tech savvy consumer who bought my kids the gadgets they needed for online learning. I have good people with me though, my brothers are all IT professionals and "pro-gamers." They gave me a list of what to look for in a laptop or tablet, and recommendations of actual models. They offered to build me a unit for their nephew but they were quite frank that they will buy a high-end gaming pc so that my son can play with them. No thanks.

    But when I got to the stores, I was almost sweet-talked by those fast-talking sales people. It was a good thing though that my brothers knew I am easily swayed or stupid when it comes to tech stuff. One of them came with me, to make sure I get the right one.

  • jcoppi29
    replied
    It is true that it is necessary to put the online setting for learning on the table, and make it as viable and as accessible as possible. An issue, however, would be a not-so tech savvy consumer aiming to buy supplies or resources that facilitate online learning. Learning should be a priority indeed, however, it would also help if things are clarified when it comes to the minimum resource requirements for such tasks. Recently, I've built my own PC and while I was rummaging around threads on what a build should be, I would see a lot of people selling high-grade, gaming pcs and just call it "for online learning" when in truth, you don't need a dedicated videocard (for pcs for example) to be able to attend zoom meetings or learn courses.

    It's just tragic that a lot of people are in need of resources to meet the current shift to online distance learning, and there are many more that take advantage of the pressure by selling overkill, overpriced supplies to those that are not exactly informed -- you know, the sort that gets surprised af when hearing powerful terms like graphics cards, quad-core, overclock, and any other sugarcoated term.

    A lot of people have either wasted money because they got fooled into buying an underpowered, pre-owned build, or they wasted more for parts that they don't really need for online courses at all.

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