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Professionalism: What It Is

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  • Bjun
    commented on 's reply
    jcoppi29 Right? How you treat other people really shows a lot about your characteristics and these are things you'll bring with you at work.

  • Skye
    commented on 's reply
    kdy, I questioned her integrity because it is something I truly value in a person. When I say I cannot expect professionalism from that person, I really can't. Why? Because her character lacking in integrity, as it is now, seeps through a majority of the key points mentioned.

    Everyone makes mistakes. everyone has shortcomings. This is where accountability comes in and this is one of the key points mentioned.

    You mentioned behavior. Yes, professionalism is behavior. It is a pattern of behavior. So is unprofessionalism. It is a pattern of behavior. Meaning it is regularly repeated. If it is regularly repeated, wouldn't you judge the person based on that behavior?

    And you are right, that no one has displayed absolute professionalism for the past week. But is there absolute professionalism in humans? If you are to judge yourself in absolute terms, I wish you luck in everything.

    Self-righteous? Just because I said that I will expect professionalism from myself and not from that person? Did you mean I was being self-righteous? Or was my statement self-righteous?

  • kdy
    replied
    I have a colleague who works well with others, communicates with respect, completes tasks efficiently but does not come to work on time. Or, I know someone who is so productive at work and is well respected, but can't take accountability for her errors. There is also this individual who can take ownership, honest and very respectful of others; problem is, she is always behind her targets and seems to be making mistakes all the time

    Are they all unprofessional then?

    To me, professionalism is a behavior. It is so multi-faceted though, i don't think it would be right to define a person as unprofessional. We can say that at there was an instance that our colleague displayed a behavior that lacked professionalism, but the person is not, as a whole, unprofessional.

    So when you say Skye that you cannot expect professionalism from the person, I think that is being a bit self-righteous. Let's be honest with ourselves. In fact, I don't think anyone in this forum has displayed absolute professionalism for the past week. ... Just saying
    Last edited by kdy; 08-18-2020, 06:22 PM.

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  • Lou
    replied
    What struck me in the key points of professionalism enumerated by Skye were honesty and integrity, accountability, and respect. I always expect these key points from my workmates, more so from someone in a higher position. Honesty for me is important because your integrity lies in it and people will respect you if you are honest and do not cover-up your mistakes. Now comes accountability. How can you expect a liar to be accountable for her/his mistakes?

    I do agree that passive leaders take offense on members who stand their ground and fight for what they believe in. True, they find this behavior aggressive and even take it up upon the member. With people like this, I agree with Skye, I do not expect an ounce of professionalism from them. However, I do expect myself to be professional enough even though I've lost my respect for them. ✌✌✌

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  • Indelible_Mark
    commented on 's reply
    I don't think professionalism is a matter of perception. If one feels like they are being 'looked down upon' then the first step is to consider 'why' there is such a 'feeling' --an introspection that should lead to self-improvement..and what jcoppi29 called 'maturity of a person'. We each and all want to be with people who are winners..individuals who bring out the best in each of us --every now and then you find this professional who pushes you out of your comfort zones and challenges what you believe to be your 'professional self', and sadly find out that you are lacking.

    I believe professionalism just like truth and integrity are intrinsic, deep-rooted behaviors which the foolish finds offensive, and the passive finds 'aggressive'.

  • jcoppi29
    commented on 's reply
    This is actually a pretty accurate gauge of not only professionalism but the maturity of a person. It is expected and typical to act courteously and professionally with equals or superiors, but it can also get pretentious. The most genuine form of expressing professionalism, therefore, is how it is expressed in the conditions wherein it benefits the expressor least -- such as being a decent human being regardless of any higher socially constructed hierarchy.

  • Kamille
    replied
    Professionalism for me equals a degree of emotional intelligence. Its having the discipline to always show up to your duties and responsibilities. Its when you honor your commitment and respect the company's time and resources, and of course the people you are working with. I also agree with Bjun. Professionalism is when you show the same respect to everyone regardless of their rank, race and social standing. It goes more than just suits and good hygiene; but building good relationships and the never ending learning and improving yourself. Its maintaining good character and choosing the high road when dealing with difficulties at work.

    Its not easy to be professional at all times, especially when difficulties and high levels of pressure arise. But its a trait that we should all develop as this can be a factor for our professional success.

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  • Bjun
    replied
    One thing that stands out for me about professionalism is how one treats people who they think are below them. It's easy to be respectful, polite and nice to someone who is your superior or who you see as your equal however, it's something else if you show the same respect for someone who you think is below you. I've seen how other people look down on other professions simply because they think they are too good for that kind of job.

    I always remind myself that we are not stuck in the state we are in. We may be on top of others now but that may change in a few years so it's best to be professional and treat everyone with the same respect as you treat your supervisors.

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  • Skye
    started a topic Professionalism: What It Is

    Professionalism: What It Is

    I was updating my Linkedin profile a couple of days ago. I stumbled upon an article (https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/what-...el-w-porcupile) that I reacted to, years ago. The content still holds true though.

    Suddenly, I remembered why I read this article. There was an incident at work that made me question my colleague's professionalism. But mostly, I questioned her integrity. It made me want to quit work (that was why I was looking at my Linkedin account years ago) just so I do not have to deal with her.

    I thought I was just overreacting to the situation. So I looked up how can I be professional when working with her when I lost respect for her?

    In the article, the key points of professionalism are:

    1. Specialized knowledge
    2. Competency
    3. Honesty and integrity
    4. Respect
    5. Accountability
    6. Self-regulation
    7. Image

    I can no longer expect professionalism from her. But I expect professionalism from myself...even when it was really a challenge to do.

    The way I will handle the situation is a reflection of me, my character. Not hers. And I want to have a good reflection.
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