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  • Anybody Got Some Interview Tips?

    I struggle with interviews. Can someone help me?

  • #2
    https://www.everyvowel.com/interview/

    Suit yourself

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    • #3
      I always thoroughly read the employers website, news articles and so on. I get a good understanding of who they are, how long have they been around for, what they specialize in, how are they different and understand their history. At the interview touch on these points, you will impress the interviewers and stand out amongst the candidates.
      Last edited by stan; 04-04-2020, 02:11 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        I think Big_Fat_Panda guy mentioned it in the comments section of the blog that intangibles are important in resumes. Same goes for the interview. If you know a language at a working level, try to impress the HR guy! There is nothing wrong with showing off skills. You want that job, go get it!

        If you've worked with a culturally diverse group, don't forget to mention that either!

        Comment


        • #5
          Everyone forgetting the most important part:

          Prepare for the 'What are your weaknesses?' question!!!

          And I mean it. The hiring dude WILL ask you this. My advice to tackling this is, make it positive. Something like, 'I'm too trusting' or even 'I work too hard sometimes which I know isn't very healthy'

          I have been asked this several times and I always quote Isaac Asimov, 'My weakness is that I want to be understood. I want people to understand me. Not just the words, but the emotions behind those words as well'.
          Works like a charm (wink wink)

          Comment


          • Kamille
            Kamille commented
            Editing a comment
            I guess I did forget this challenging question.
            My advice would be to present your weakness with an action plan. This will show that you are introspective enough to know where you should improve.

          • JerryYan
            JerryYan commented
            Editing a comment
            This question is really asked often. A way this could be answered too is by researching on the programs/activities that your target companies have that aim for skill development and self-improvement for their employees then connect the skills you hope to improve on through those. It will show your enthusiasm to be with the company and your honesty to seek for improvement.

        • #6
          I agree with all of those tips. But also, are you taking courses with ICI? I only ask because one of their main selling points is the career resources they also provide as part of their service. I haven't personally used these, but you should check out their interview prep services. It never hurts to get in a little interview practice.

          I usually do some back and forth practice with a friend. I have them pretend to be the interviewer and practice answering questions. I also practice bringing up my own questions with them, such as salary concerns or questions about the workload. This really helps me take an active part in leading the interview where I want it to go and treating it more like a conversation between two professionals rather than an interrogation.

          And remember, you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you, so speak up and ask for clarification when you need it.

          Comment


          • #7
            I have used the career services ICI offers to graduates. Basically I received assistance with remaking my CV, some career counselling and assisting in find suitable roles and having my resume customized to better target the relevant job applications.

            Comment


            • #8
              I thought this was a rather helpful article and video "21 job interview tips". It covers research techniques, what do before the interview, commonly asked questions during interviews and what to do after the interview.

              https://www.indeed.com/career-advice...eat-impression

              Comment


              • sammie83
                sammie83 commented
                Editing a comment
                Interesting video! I tend to agree. Great points. Do they have any more of these videos?

            • #9
              The technique that worked best for me was jotting down sample answers to the most common interview questions. Then, I practice in front of the mirror or with my friend.

              Here is a link about the 10 most asked interview questions that you could start with:
              https://www.seek.com.au/career-advic...tions-answered

              All the best!!
              Last edited by mjmnl; 04-21-2020, 07:54 AM.

              Comment


              • #10
                Research. Know what you are applying for. Find out what the company values.

                Compare. The information you got from your research compare it against your qualifications, strengths and values.

                Practice. Practice speaking about yourself.

                Breathe. You'll be able to think better.

                Ask questions. You do not know everything. So ask and you shall receive an answer.

                Comment


                • kdy
                  kdy commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I remember when I was still with the Toastmasters, every meeting would have this "table topics" portion where chosen members would be given a topic. They are just given a minute to think about what they will say and 2 minutes to talk about the topic. They should be able to deliver an impromptu speech about the topic without going over the time limit.

                  You can do this every now and then. just pick an object, maybe.... or a current event. Give yourself a minute to think, and try to say something about it within 2 minutes. Record yourself and listen to your speech. Try to see if you were able to open, make a point and close within the time limit. This exercise will allow you to think on your toes and deliver a cohesive response to a question without going on and on to the point of blabbering.

              • #11
                I agree with all the tips mentioned and would like to add a few more.

                1. Get a good night sleep the night before. You'll look and feel better which will help you make the best first impression.
                2. Know your strengths. Have a story from your old job that exemplifies one of your strengths.
                3. Know how to answer the question, “What can you contribute to the company?”
                4. Breathe. Take the time to collect your thoughts.
                5. After the interview, make a list of items you did well and item you would like to improve on.
                Lastly, don't forget to reward yourself. You did your best and you deserve it!

                Best of luck!

                Comment


                • sammie83
                  sammie83 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Great tips Kamille! I agree with the sleep especially hahahah nothing like being fresh and well rested to be at your personal best

                • Indelible_Mark
                  Indelible_Mark commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I particularly like the suggestion to 'self recap' specially if it is something that the interviewer did not do (most do not) with you. The mental and emotional exercise should 'free your mind' in preparation for doing better. Nice one!

              • #12
                I used to interview applicants and I usually ask situational questions. I suggest that you always answer in the STAR or STAR AR format. (what is the situation, what is the task, what was your action, and what was the result). It is very important that you are able to send accross 2 things here, you know your task, and that you are able to take action based on task resulting to a positive result. However, Interviewers are not expecting perfect applicants, we do make mistakes. So if the result was not positive, follow your STAR through with your AR (alternative action, and alternative result). This is very valuable because it is important that you are able to showcase that you are able to see your errors and that you have the ability to learn from it and do better.

                Another important tip - Be specific and be measurable. Dont give answers like " I will do my best to learn the tasks" because that is vague and does not give a clear picture of your work ethics, performance and competence.

                Comment


                • mjmnl
                  mjmnl commented
                  Editing a comment
                  We had mock interviews in our university before and this is one of the advice I got from the career counsellors. They said answering in this format makes your response organized and looks more professional. It also makes it more understandable which gives a good impression to the interviewer. I honestly hated going for interviews specially when I was just starting. I'm not that confident facing and answering the recruiter. With the added pressure, I tend to forget about answering in STAR format. Lucky for me, a company that I once applied for has given me feedback at the end of the interview and told me that my answers are kinda unsystematic. After that one, I always answered situational questions using STAR format and generated a positive result!

              • #13
                Preparations never really hurt anyone. Yes, I am a firm believer of this as I have mentioned on my previous comments. However, you also have to realize that you are a stranger to the interviewer, or at least most of the time. Opening up to them on a personal level might not be the worst idea. It gives the impression that every word you say was drawn up from the experience you had or it is a skill developed by your own hard work. Remember it is always easier to answer by recalling a past memory on how you've done it rather than remembering what you've memorized to answer that question.
                Last edited by mjmnl; 05-04-2020, 06:04 AM.

                Comment


                • #14
                  Fair warning though, not all interviewers can be pleasant or 'professional'. Sometimes we equate professionalism with ethical behavior. While those do go together, professionalism and ethical behaviors are not identical. While you prepare for that dreaded interview with your 'best behavior' you will also want to be aware of bad interviewer habits like https://www.experience.com/advice/jo...-an-interview/ questions that you should not be asked, behavior displays that are abusive, dismissive, even downright insulting.

                  Ever been with a rude interviewer? a bad interviewer but not because of you? Share what you did and i'm sure we could all use a tip or two.

                  Comment


                  • sammie83
                    sammie83 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Fortunately, I have had good interviewers! But I have heard for a few horror stories when sexism and discrimination occurred. A bias still exists by some recruiters. it could be because of their colour, social-economic status, that they have children or don't have children. People are discriminated against constantly and most of us will never know about it.

                  • Kamille
                    Kamille commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I remember being fresh out of college, I went on an interview for a customer related position in a hotel. The first question I was asked was about my zodiac sign. When I told the hiring manager that I am a water sign, she immediately ended the interview and told me they "only hire earth and air signs to maintain harmony". This was my very first job interview so you can imagine how much I prepared. After that, I verified from their website and job postings, there was no mention that they are particular with their employees' astrological signs.

                    I was surprised I was discriminated because of the position of the stars and planets on the day I was born.
                    Last edited by Kamille; 05-27-2020, 12:22 PM.

                • #15
                  I remember good interviews but I will never forget disastrous ones. There was one interview for a service company and all the interviewer did was make me write down answers to question, watch me write my answers down, and then read my answers for five maybe ten minutes.

                  It wasn't even an interview! I never did go back to that office even when they asked me for a second interview!

                  Comment


                  • jcoppi29
                    jcoppi29 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I can attest to this. Though, an explanation of this in a neuropsychological sense, is that our brains are wired to perceive the negatives. Heck, emotions, especially negative ones release a chemical that enhances the memory creation process.

                    Humans naturally remember the bad stuff sharper than the good ones as a means to survive, and the above givens are also the reason why the high highs and low lows of one's life are often the most unforgettable.

                  • mjmnl
                    mjmnl commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Thank goodness I have never experienced any bad interview because of the interviewer or the hiring processes of the company. If there was even a bad interview, it's completely my fault. Some of it is because I failed to prepare and research more about the company or at some point because I am not updated with current events. And that's something you would want to prepare for too. Especially if you're applying for a job that heavily relies on external data including sales or business analysis.

                    During my first interview, the question that caught me off guard is when they ask me what I wanted to ask them. This is usually at the end of the interview, make sure that you also prepare questions that you really want to know and it should be connected to the company and the work that you're aiming for.
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