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What do you think is the best course of action: Choosing a degree program or diploma?

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  • What do you think is the best course of action: Choosing a degree program or diploma?

    I belong to an immigrant household. People have advised me to choose college, but my family's financial position isnt strong enough to fund my education. I have nowhere to go!

  • #2
    Where's everybody gone!

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    • Bjun
      Bjun commented
      Editing a comment
      Have you decided on what career path to take? I think knowing what job you'd like to have would have a big impact in determining if you need to go to uni or if you can opt to get a diploma from a vocational or online college instead. For my friends that didn't have the financial capacity to study in uni, I advised to get a diploma first. This would give them a better chance at employment, which may allow them to (hopefully) save up to study in uni.

  • #3
    Nowhere mate! We right here.

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    • #4
      I'm not an immigrant but I can imagine the struggles man. Must be so tough adjusting to a new country and its culture.

      imo ICI is a good alternative for you. I mean, you are paying approx. $40 for a week of lessons, gaining valuable hands-on experience along the way! Honestly, I don't think you can ask for much more financially.

      Added benefit: You can work part-time to fund your education as well!

      Comment


      • Bjun
        Bjun commented
        Editing a comment
        Good point on working part-time. One of the perks of online learning where you're in charge of your own schedule. I agree, he can always get a diploma to boost his chances of employment. It's faster than getting a degree.

    • #5
      Thanks for the suggestion mate. Will keep in mind, while applying.

      by the way, I never said I was an oimmigrant. Just that my parents were immigrants. I am an Aussie by birth. parents are from Botswana!

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      • #6
        I can relate to your story I_Was_There. My parents immigrated to Australia from India in the 1980s. My dad runs an indian food vending business on a truck. We are 3 siblings me being the oldest. I just graduated school, and am having doubts if college is the best course of action.

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        • Bjun
          Bjun commented
          Editing a comment
          What path have you decided to take? I mean, enrolling to an online course might be a good option if you haven't decided on enrolling to uni yet.

      • #7
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        • #8
          A lot depends on what your career goals are. There are many vocations and careers that don't require a college degree to succeed in. Certification programs work for a lot of job areas, and that may be all you need to gain traction and make progress. A certification program can also be a first stepping stone for a career path that does need a degree at some point. Get certified in a legal vocation, for example, and you can get a job in the legal field, learn more about the field and make connections, and earn money toward your degree program. Kind of like renting a place when you move to a new town instead of buying--you can get to know the area before making the big money move.

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          • Bjun
            Bjun commented
            Editing a comment
            Good point. A lot of industries do not require a college degree but a college degree will certainly help you climb up the professional ladder. I agree that you can always start with a diploma program as a stepping stone. It would be good to note too, that if you would be using your diploma to gain credits for further studies, to make sure the uni or college you'd be applying to would recognise your diploma.

        • #9
          LifelongLearner You forgot to mention the opportunities for freelancing! I mean you can offer legal and para-legal services online on freelancing platforms. They earn a sh*t ton of cash!

          And I almost forgot...transcription jobs!

          Honestly, go to any transcription platform, and they're offering between $30 to $50 per hour (depending on experience and job success) for para-legal and para-medical transcription and advisory services!

          Comment


          • Bjun
            Bjun commented
            Editing a comment
            Do you mean freelancing while OP completes his diploma or degree? That's the beauty of freelance, isn't it, you can work and study at the same time.

            Also, I need to look into these paralegal and transcription jobs you're talking about. Which platforms are you using?

        • #10
          Originally posted by I_Was_There View Post
          LifelongLearner You forgot to mention the opportunities for freelancing! I mean you can offer legal and para-legal services online on freelancing platforms. They earn a sh*t ton of cash!
          Hey, if that's what floats someone's boat, freelancing is absolutely an option. I've been a freelancer for a long time and love it...but it's not for everyone. The OP, though, asked about diploma v degree, so advocating freelancing didn't really seem on topic to me. But, yes, it's a viable option if one is talented in that direction. I'm making good money with top companies based on my corporate and entrepreneurial expereince.

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          • #11
            LifelongLearner Chill out, mate. Let people add value to their lives.

            BTW I think if you've got the brains and the financial muscle to choose a college, and can afford a couple mis-steps in life, then college might be better. If, on the other hand, you're not a brainiac and dont stand out amongst your academic peers or for some reason can't afford the tuition fees, I'd suggest you choose a vocational diploma instead of taking out a loan.

            Because 1. You'll spend the rest of your life paying it back

            2. We all know how saturated the market is. To qualify for a job, you need some serious credentials. Simply obtaining a degree won't ensure that!

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            • #12
              Diploma all day. Not only for the cost effectiveness, but the hands on experience it offers as well. Degree programs get nowhere near the diplomas and vocational training when it comes to doing actual stuff. A degree teaches to the philosophy of the work you're doing but not show you the way its supposed to be done.

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              • #13
                I agree with LifelongLearner with his thoughts that it will depend on the person's career goals. I know a lot of people who are still paying back their student loans even after working full time for 3 years. Some of them really didn't mind the fees because they always take pride in taking up their degree program and it brought them to the stable job they have now. However, there are also others who have slight regret spending so much and realized they could've spent this in training, certificates, and diplomas. That really depends on your goals. So before you go for something, think about it a million times.

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                • #14
                  The answer will depend on your resources and your objective. If you do not have the financial resources, the time capital, forego getting a degree. For now, at least. Take a diploma course, work, have all your ducks in a row. Then if you still want to go get that degree, by all means, do so.

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                  • #15
                    I think it would depend on the job market you're aiming for and your goals and preferences. Some jobs do not exactly require degrees because they're focused on particular skillsets, like coding, programming, or web design, for example. If the skill you're looking for is very marketable and in high demand, you can focus on non-degree programs once you find out which skills are in demand. Degrees usually apply for very technical courses that require degrees or masters qualifications like registered nurses, psychotherapists etc.

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