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Should You Apply For A Job That You Are Not Qualified For?

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  • Should You Apply For A Job That You Are Not Qualified For?

    I have a friend who’s looking for a job and I have been forwarding her job ads I saw online. I don’t know her qualifications so I just sent her the ads I thought were suitable for her.

    Then, I saw a post of one recruiter saying that applicants need not apply if they do not meet ALL the qualifications and requirements listed in the ad. Due to the high volume of job seekers at this time, applying to every job available is eating up the recruiter’s time as they have to review each application only to find out that the applicant is not qualified.

    As some job ads list a lot of qualifications you have to meet and describe the perfect candidate, should/would you still apply for these jobs even if you did not meet all the requirements? Have you applied to a job you’re not qualified for? Did you get the job?

    The article: How To Get A Job You're Not Qualified For (https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan...-qualified-for) might shed some light on this. Anyone ever wrote a Pain Letter before?

  • #2
    I think it depends. If the job requires highly technical skills and I don't have it, I wouldn't risk it. There may be 50 other applicants that have the skill set they are looking for. If I'm really interested in the job, I'd challenge myself and learn it first and see if its something that is really suitable for me.

    If its just a description of the company's ideal applicant, I'd take my chances. I know fresh graduates who got accepted to a job that requires 10 years of experience. Or a job that requires a Master's degree but they have more years of expertise and experience. Some companies value applicant's character and work values other than their 'checklist'. Some even pay for trainings and seminars in order for you to meet their qualification.

    I think it would be best to consider it carefully. If your friend is confident that she can eventually meet the company's expectations even if she lacks some of the qualifications, or if she is willing to be trained, it wouldn't hurt to try. Just remember to be honest about it and not resort to lying on resumes.
    Last edited by Kamille; 09-24-2020, 02:16 PM.

    Comment


    • Skye
      Skye commented
      Editing a comment
      Kamille, this is so true. Sometimes those who are fresh off school are easier to train than veterans in the workplace. As the employer, you will have the opportunity (and challenge) of molding and honing these fresh graduates to what you want them to be.

    • mjmnl
      mjmnl commented
      Editing a comment
      I agree, hiring fresh graduates has both advantage and disadvantage. The biggest advantage, as Skye mentioned, is being open to learning therefore making them more trainable. The most common disadvantage is having no work experience. I remember a meme about fresh graduates looking for a job, it drives them nuts knowing that jobs available needs at least 2 years of experience before they get hired. Are you guys familiar? It's quite relatable. 😂
      Kidding aside, I am still encouraging your friend to take the chance as long as it's within her expertise. There are a lot of råeasons why a company may hire a fresh graduate. You can read them here: https://www.glassdoor.co.uk/employer...hire-graduate/

    • Bjun
      Bjun commented
      Editing a comment
      Skye I remember the time I applied for a position in a lab and was told they prefer someone who has no experience because they complain less and is more "trainable". They are also less demanding with the salaries and benefits. He then pointed to the other applicants outside, who clearly looked like fresh graduates so eager to land their first jobs. Maybe they just saw someone with experience as set on their ways while fresh grads are more pliable. It may be difficult to teach old dogs new tricks after all.

  • #3
    Nah, haven't written a pain letter before. Haven't used any cover letter either (lucky me so far).

    If I want the job, yes, I still apply, even if I do not meet all the requirements. But of course, within reason. There are some "requirements" that you can learn along the way.

    As for swamping HR, that's their job to sift through all those applications and get those qualified to the next level. There are now AI technologies to assist them.

    And yes, I have applied for jobs that I am not qualified for YET. Did I land the job? I landed my current job even though I lacked certain requirements at the onset. But there were parameters set by the company that I had to meet specific standards within a given time frame.

    Comment


    • #4
      If you are up to the challenge then go ahead and apply. Working and employment now is not like in the past wherein whatever your skill set or what you graduated from is already your pre-determined employment (not everyone can be managers or presidents lol!). I said this one and will say it again, it is always better to be multi-talented and adaptable rather than being focused on one skill set only.

      Comment


      • JerryYan
        JerryYan commented
        Editing a comment
        I agree. With how fast and frequent we change the way we do things in the workplace to cope with the trends in hiring, and system operations, what's important is that we ensure we have the basics ingrained in us to adapt and better our skills for the role. This allows us to do varied tasks and roles and not be restricted to one predetermined path.

      • Lou
        Lou commented
        Editing a comment
        Oh, this is so true Gerhard. This is why we must be open to changes as it is the only constant in this world. And true, not everyone can be managers or presidents. Even those who are in the position already are questionable at times 😁😁😁

        Going back to the question, HECK YEAH! It's better to try and fail rather than not try and always burden yourself with what if's. Nowadays, companies do not focus that much on skills as it is something that can be taught. Character, however, is something that is innate. Companies are slowly shifting their focus on soft skills when hiring new employees. Check out why here: https://www.indeed.com/career-advice...ills-important

    • #5
      With all the jobs I've had before, I was not able to not meet ALL the requirements that they were looking for but I still got the position. When I was a job seeker, I looked at the company's values, goals, and working environment first then I check if there is a job opening for my background. I got a job for a position that required at least 5 years of experience right after I graduated from college. I just took the chance and never really expected that they'll contact me. But of course like what others said, if they require technical skills that I don't even have any idea about, I wouldn't budge. Especially if the technical skills required is crucial to the tasks and it takes years to learn. On the other hand, soft skills and some other requirements can be acquired through time and experience.
      Last edited by mjmnl; 09-25-2020, 07:13 AM.

      Comment


      • #6
        I think it would be much more accurate to base on one's potentialities, as measured by recruitment-related assessments. Some applicants may not have all the requirements for a particular job position, but we can never really tell until they're assessed for the role directly. There are instances wherein the necessary skills are already developed and present in some applicants even if they don't have experience.

        For example, natural English speakers are already around Expert in the general setting (though they don't think they're experts). Tech-savvy applicants easily learn other tech-related platforms as well. It depends on the job position, I guess, and its assessment strategies to determine best hires.

        Comment


        • JerryYan
          JerryYan commented
          Editing a comment
          Now this a new challenge for hiring managers. It will be their responsibility to filter depending on the role they have if they want someone skill-ready or culture adaptable or if both is present in their applicants, then better. A mixture of both in a team will surely be advantageous too.

      • #7
        When I applied for my first job, I really did not meet one of the qualifications. Just the same, I submitted my resume and went through the hiring process. I stayed with the company for 12 years before I moved to my current job. And while working in the industry I even managed to even move two levels up. So I guess, there is no shame in trying. Often, job posts would provide the set of tasks that the applicant would be doing if hired. Maybe, we just need to run a bit of self-assessment to determine if we have reasonable skills to actually deliver.

        Comment


        • #8
          A funny thing or I would have to say stupid is companies who "hire" managers or supervisors and higher ups but require those with experience in that particular field. They always hire externally just for the fun of it and end up hiring internally. No one graduates with experience as a manager already or supervisor but yes we still take our chances and apply.

          Comment


          • Skye
            Skye commented
            Editing a comment
            Sometimes, people get pirated. They have experience in that particular field, only they are working for a different company. I also know some companies or organizations wherein they advertise an opening but they already have someone to hire. They are just posting for compliance. But that's a different matter altogether.

          • JerryYan
            JerryYan commented
            Editing a comment
            That's true. It's worth it to take chances on those roles. If ever you get to at least the initial interview phase and sway even a bit of doubt on whoever they have their eyes on for them to consider having someone new in the place is already something. Even better if you get hired and be given the chance to show them good work! 😊

        • #9
          There are job listings too that are looking for people who are highly skilled as indicated in the job specification. However, if you continue reading through the job description, you'll then realize that this job is something you can actually perform well. I wasn't that confident in applying before and I back out as soon as I see that I don't qualify. But it changed when I saw that my dream company that time has a job opening. I didn't care at all whether I'm qualified or not. I end up getting hired. So my advice, just take the chance, you'll never know what's in store for you!

          Comment

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